Peru Menu Main Menu What's New Best of this Site Radio History Clandestine Radio

Radio Sudamerica, Peru


The following item is taken from Relampago DX #124 (December 2000) by Takayuki Inoue Nozaki. It is placed here with permission.

Por las Rutas del Perú (33) ...

It was in early July of 1994 that Radio Sudamérica, the fourth commercial broadcaster established in Cutervo, was first noted by Latin American DX enthusiasts. The station emerged on the odd frequency of 5521.25 kHz in the aeronautical mobile band. Although the station aimed at transmitting on the nominal frequency of 5525 kHz, the shortwave outlet was logged drifting in the frequency range between 5521.2 kHz and 5522.4 kHz from July of 1994 through March of 1996.

Radio Sudamérica was temporarily off the air from the shortwave bands in the middle of March of 1996. However, after a silence of about three months, the station resumed its shortwave transmissions in early June of 1996. Afterward, the station moved up slightly to a variable frequency range between 5522.3 kHz and 5522.6 kHz, in which it remained from June of 1996 through December of 1998, with some short intermissions.

In December of 1998, Radio Sudamérica vanished from the shortwave bands, and was silent for several months. Reportedly, the transmitting units were damaged by arson on December 18, 1998. However, having endeavored to reactivate the broadcasting operations, the station resumed the medium wave transmissions in March of 1999. It was noted in early June of 1999 that the shortwave outlet went back on the air after six months of silence. Slightly moving down to another variable frequency range between 5523.0 kHz and 5523.3 kHz near the previously used channel, Radio Sudamérica remained broadcasting on shortwave.

On December 29, 1994, I visited Radio Sudamérica, which was located at Jirón Ramón Castilla No. 704 in front of the main square, Plaza de Armas in Cutervo. It was in a two-story building painted of white walls, that was shared between a general store on the first floor and the station facilities on the second floor. There was no station billboard outside, though a remarkable Yagi type antenna for FM transmission on the top of the building made it easy to find the station. Going up to the second floor, there was a space of four meters square, which served as both a reception area and an administration office with a steel desk and three wooden chairs. At the reception desk, I explained to a young man the purpose of my visit. His name was Jorge Paredes Guevara, the administrative manager of Radio Sudamérica. He was very excited by knowing that the shortwave transmissions had been received in Japan, and was pleased that a listener coming from abroad would bother to visit Radio Sudamérica. He ushered me into the station facilities. Located next to the reception area and administration office, there was the broadcasting studio surrounded by plywood partitions and a wooden door. The studio, which was separated by a partition with a large plate glass window, was composed of a control cabin and an announcing room with two microphones for reading the news and doing interviews. The control cabin was equipped with a "Nippon Amerika" brand MX-2030EV model console mixer (8 channels), two "Technics" brand SCD-303 model turntables, a "Technics" brand SH-803B model stereo amplifier, two "Panasonic National" brand radio-cassette recorders, a "Sony" brand radio-cassette recorder that functioned as double cassette recorders, a "Scala" brand SG-300 model audio processor, and a "Sony" brand microphone. In the control cabin, there were many LPs, 45s records and cassette tapes displayed in an orderly manner on the side of the console table.

"Radio Sudamérica Socidad de Responsabilidad Limitada" was established by Amadeo Mario Muñoz Guivar and his relatives on August 15, 1993 as the fourth commercial broadcasting enterprise in Cutervo. The first studio and office were installed at Jirón Ramón Castilla No. 704 nearby the Plaza de Armas. The station began its broadcasts on the nominal frequency of 1060 kHz with a "Jorge Gómez Torres" brand transmitter. Its output power was nominally rated as 1.5 kW, though the station carried its medium wave transmissions with a reduced power of 1 kW to conserve the transmitting tubes and to avoid over modulation.

On June 27, 1994, Radio Sudamérica started its shortwave transmissions in order to enlarge the service area and to reach more people living in the remote villages and towns in the Department of Cajamarca and in other neighboring departments. The shortwave outlet operated on the nominal frequency of 5525 kHz with a "Electrónica Reserva" brand transmitter of 0.25 kW. According to DXers' monitoring from 1994 through 2000, it was sporadically observed that Radio Sudamérica has been slightly drifting between 5521.5 kHz and 5523.1 kHz.

In November of 1994, Radio Sudamérica purchased a "OMB" brand transmitter for the FM stereo transmission. The station operated on the nominal frequency of 95.3 MHz with an output power of 100 watts. As of December 1994, the FM outlet was in experimental operations and was on the air irregularly, simulcasting the programs of shortwave and medium wave. While being in Cutervo, I noticed that the FM outlet was only used on the occasion of New Year's eve, December 31, 1994. Jorge Paredes Guevara, the administrative manager, informed me that in the future. Radio Sudamérica would broadcast independent programs on FM and AM (medium wave and shortwave) respectively.

As of January of 1995, Radio Sudamérica broadcast at 1130-0300 from Monday to Saturday. The regular broadcasts on weekdays were scheduled with the following programs: 1200-1300 "Por las Rutas del Ande", 1300-1400 "El Noticiero Diario del Aire" (primera edición), 1400-1500 "Variedades Musicales", 1500-1700 "Fuego Tropical Andino", 1700-1800 "Mediodía Criollo", 1800-1900 "El Noticiero Diario del Aire" (segunda edición), 1900-2000 "Miscelánea de la Cumbia Peruana", 2000-2200 "Variedades Musicales", 2200-2300 "Buenas Noches Ecuador", 2300-2400 "La Voz de la Liberación", 2400-0100 "Música Latinoamericana", and 0100-0300 "Boleros Inolvidables". On Saturday, the station carried programming similar to those on weekdays, though the noontime newscasts were not broadcast. On Sunday, the station transmitted at 1200-2300 and mainly broadcast a variety of music programs with the personal messages, greetings and personal communication services.

When I visited Radio Sudamérica, the station had been on the air without broadcasting licenses. However, they applied for them to the Ministry of Transports and Communications. Afterward, I learned from the official list of registered broadcasting stations issued by the Ministry of Transports and Communications, that the three outlets were eventually authorized to broadcast on the airwaves. In the first place, on December 12, 1995, the medium wave outlet was definitely authorized to transmit on 1060 kHz with the callsign OCX2Y under Ministerial Resolution No. 0523-95-MTC/ TEL for a ten-year period.

On February 13, 1998, Radio Sudamérica received the definitive broadcasting license for the shortwave transmission with the callsign OCW2D for a ten-year period, under Ministerial Resolution No. 0067-98-MTC/TEL. The shortwave outlet has been officially assigned to 3320 kHz in the 90-meter band since it was authorized to conduct experimental transmissions for a one-year period in 1997. However, in order to get major coverage and to avoid interference from other stations, Radio Sudamérica presently continues to remain on the nominal frequency of 5525 kHz, outside the broadcasting bands assigned to the region by the ITU.

On February 13, 1998, the FM outlet was definitely authorized to operate on the frequency of 97.7 MHz with the callsign OCT2H under Ministerial Resolution No. 0066-98-MTC/TEL for a ten-year period. Its authorized output power is 0.25 kW. Consequently, the FM outlet changed from 95.3 MHz to the assigned frequency of 97.7 MHz.

I learned that after my visit to Cutervo in December of 1994, the studio and office were moved to Jirón Ramón Castilla No. 491, only a couple of blocks from the first studio. It was already mentioned in the station letterhead, which I obtained for my QSL letter and my visit's certification.

"Desde Cutervo, Cajamarca, Perú, América del Sur, transmite Radio Sudamérica, onda media 1060, onda corta 5525 kHz, con nuestras oficinas ubicadas en Jirón Ramón Castilla 491, tercer nivel, Plaza de Armas, telefónos 074-736090 y 737443. Con orgullo decimos: Somos Radio Sudamérica, una señal cutervina llegando a todo el Perú y el mundo."

Technical Information

OCX2Y 1060 kHz: is equipped with a "Jorge Gómez Torres" brand transmitter of 1.5 kW and a 1/8 wave vertical antenna (35 meters high above the ground). As of December of 1994, it was actually tunable on the measured frequency of 1060.1 kHz.
OCW2D 5525 kHz: is equipped with a "Electrónica Reserva" brand transmitter of 0.25 kW and a 1/2 wave dipole antenna (13.5 meters high above the ground). On February 13, 1998, the shortwave outlet was definitely licensed to transmit on 3320 kHz in the 90-meter band under Ministerial Resolution R.M.-0067-98-MTC/TEL for a ten-year period.
OCT2H 97.7 MHz: is equipped with a "OMB" brand EM 20/30 model transmitter of 0.01 kW and a Yagi type antenna (15 meters high above the ground). As of December of 1994, the station irregularly used the FM outlet on the occasion of special events, and transmitted on 95.3 MHz. Afterward on February 13, 1998, the FM outlet was licensed to transmit on 97.7 MHz under Ministerial Resolution R.M.-0066-98-MTC/TEL for a ten-year period.

Transmitter site: Zona Las Brisas, Pueblo Nuevo Oriente, Provincia de Cutervo, Departamento de Cajamarca, República del Perú. It is situated one kilometer east of the studio. The transmitter site and studio are connected by a fixed coaxial cable.
Studio: Jirón Ramón Castilla No. 491, 3er piso, Plaza de Armas, Cutervo, Provincia de Cutervo, Departamento de Cajamarca, República del Perú.


This website is maintained by Don Moore,
Association of North American Radio Clubs
DXer of the Year for 1995

My Address Is In This Graphic